FOG guidelines in Louisville, Kentucky

Fats, oil, and grease (FOG) can clog up the sewer system like nothing else. We’ve talked about FOG generally in our blog posts previously, but not in terms of locality-specific guidance. Today, we are going to take a look at FOG guidelines in Louisville, Kentucky. Hopefully, looking at the city’s rules will help you see how FOG principles play out in context.

FOG guidelines in Louisville

The Louisville/Jefferson County Metropolitan Sewer District (MSD) is a regional non-profit agency that monitors and maintains the wastewater treatment system in the metropolitan area. MSD has a significant amount of guidance and sets of rules related to FOG disposal. Food service establishments (FSEs) have to be in compliance with FOG management guidelines.

The guidelines are substantial, so we won’t do a line-by-line analysis in this blog post. However, there are a few important highlights that you should be aware of. Here are some of the main points:

Food establishments are classified by size

Depending on the type of establishment you run, MSD assigned a different FSE class. There are 5 classes: for a sense of scale, Class 1 FSEs have the lowest output of FOGs and require 25 gallon/minute or 50 pound grease traps, and Class 5 FSEs have the highest output and require 2,000 gallon grease interceptors (or an equivalent capacity with multiple units). An example of a Class 1 FSE would be an ice cream or coffee shop. A Class 5 FSE might be a hospital or prison. The main takeaway here is that FSE class dictates what sort of FOG removal system you need in place.

There are several important prohibitions

Using an up to code grease trap or interceptor is a necessary first step for FSEs. However, there are a few things that you can’t do while using these units. For one, you can’t continuously run hot water through units. You also can’t allow concentrated detergents, alkaline solutions, or acidic solutions run through grease traps and interceptors. In addition, FSEs are not allowed to use additives for grease management. Additives are any products that contain solvents, acids, bacteria, enzymes, emulsifiers, and other similar ingredients. They have the potential to contribute to FOG buildup and interference with MSD systems. This is especially problematic if you use them right before liquids go into grease traps or interceptors.

There are a few exceptions here. You can use additives to clean drain lines, but only in amounts and ways such that FOGs won’t be put into the sewer system or that FOGs will be temporarily broken down and allowed to pass through grease traps and interceptors. Additionally, 100% bacteria additives are allowed to be used, but you need to get MSD approval first. Always check with MSD before using any additives you think may be allowable.

FSEs must use certified plumbers/haulers to manage FOG

Grease traps and interceptors require specific cleaning. MSD requires FSEs to have certified plumbers/haulers perform cleaning and removal procedures. Certified plumbers/haulers go through MSD-led training to stay up to date with procedures. These professionals are the people you should work closely with for your regular trap and interceptor maintenance and certification. MSD requires documentation of all cleanings and inspections too. Working with these professionals ensures that you will be up to code and have all of the paperwork you need in an organized fashion.

Schedule your next grease service by contacting Moon Grease Trap Cleaning at 502-453-0154! We have certified experts who will make sure your FSE is up to code. We are happy to answer any and all questions you may have!